Hispanic-Latinx Heritage Month 2022

 September 15 – October 15

Event evaluation form

September

14th – Latinx Connections Support Group

Join Zoom Meeting, Meeting ID: 926 3741 0853, Passcode: 948733

This weekly discussion group is open to all Latin-identified UNCG students, regardless of identities, nationality, or racial/ethnic background. A supportive  atmosphere to engage in fun activities, interactions  and conversations. A willingness to engage and honor group members’ privacy are the only requirements to attend.

Start & end time: Every Wednesday 3:30 to 4:30 Zoom 

14th – ALPFA Hispanic/Latinx Heritage Month Kick Off Event 

5:00-6:30pm, EUC Lawn

Games, paletas, face paintings…

15thTech-focused Mock Interview and Resume Review Workshop

9am-11am at GTCC Conference Center, Colfax, NC

Hosted by Lenovo during the second day of the LatinxEd Education Summit. Details. (Students do not need to register for the Summit to take advantage of this opportunity). More info.

17th – Beinvenidos a UNCG

10:00am – 1:30pm in School of Education Building 114

A celebration of Hispanic heritage focused on the U.S. educational system, UNCG admissions and financial aid. Meet parents, students,

and student groups from UNCG’s Latinx community and enjoy student

entertainment.

Intended audience: Latinx Juniors & Seniors in high schools

Link to register

20th – Cafe y Conversacion with Provost Storrs in attendance to meet and speak with students from 9:00-9:30am.

9am-10am, Taylor Garden (rain location is OIE in EUC 062)

Come enjoy coffee varieties sustainably sourced from Latin American countries, and Churrors provided by Sofrito.

21st – Latinx Connections Support Group

Join Zoom Meeting, Meeting ID: 926 3741 0853, Passcode: 948733

This weekly discussion group is open to all Latin-identified UNCG students, regardless of identities, nationality, or racial/ethnic background. A supportive  atmosphere to engage in fun activities, interactions  and conversations. A willingness to engage and honor group members’ privacy are the only requirements to attend.

Start & end time: Every Wednesday 3:30 to 4:30 Zoom 

22nd – Flamenco Dancing and Class

4:00-4:45pm, Moran Commons Fountain. (Rain Location EUC Cone Ballroom B)

Come join Corazón Gitano, a locally based Flamenco group, for a performance and a chance to learn some basic Flamenco rhythms and dance steps! Experience the culture of Spain through this vibrant and colorful  tradition. No special attire needed.

24thAdmissions Open House

24th – Zumba

2:30-3:30, EUC Kaplan Commons

Zumba is an energizing dance fitness class based on Latin American dance rhythms. Comfortable clothing and shoes are recommended. All are welcome!

24th – Community Event hosted by Greensboro Symphony and Hispanic League: Celebration: Hispanic Heritage Month

The free event will feature Josie Borges & Mariachi Los Galleros, Alejandro Galvez’s traditional Aztec dancing, Ballet Folclorico Corazón de Mexico, as well as multiple food trucks and family-friendly activities, all leading up to Mariachi Cobre with GSO streamed live in the park!

6pm, LeBauer Park in Downtown Greensboro

27th – Loteria Night with ALPFA

Location: SOE Room #224, 6:00pm

Join ALPFA UNCG for a night of Loteria and prizes for UNCG students

28th – Latinx Connections Support Group

Join Zoom Meeting, Meeting ID: 926 3741 0853, Passcode: 948733

This weekly discussion group is open to all Latin-identified UNCG students, regardless of identities, nationality, or racial/ethnic background. A supportive  atmosphere to engage in fun activities, interactions  and conversations. A willingness to engage and honor group members’ privacy are the only requirements to attend.

Every Wednesday 3:30 to 4:30 Zoom 

28th – Bachata Night with Ritmo Latino 

EUC Claxton Room, 6:30pm-7:30pm

Teach UNCG students basics of a certain Latin genre to enhance their dancing experiences (Bachata)

29th – Cafe y Conversacion

Taylor Garden (rain location is OIE in EUC 062) 11am-12pm

 Come enjoy coffee varieties sustainably sourced from Latin American countries, and Churrors provided by Sofrito.

29thLatino/a/x VOISES panel

Faculty Center, 1:00-2:15pm

Intended for faculty and staff. Registration required 

October

3rd – Cafe y Conversation: Becoming a Latinx Scholar

Taylor Garden, rain location is OIE, 3:00-4:00pm

Brief description: Come and connect with Latinx faculty and students about navigating academic spaces as scholars.  Enjoy coffee varieties sustainably sourced from Latin American countries, and Churrors provided by Sofrito. 

Intended audience: Graduate students and undergraduate students interested in graduate school, Latinx faculty

4th Papel Picado Creations Workshop

EUC Dail Room, 11am-1:00pm

Come join us for a fun time making papel picado. Decorative flags that you can hang in your room, office, or classroom. Come ready to get creative! 

Intended audience: students, faculty and staff

4th – Together Podemos (We Can)

Tuesday, October 4th, 062 in the EUC 5:30-8pm. Facilitated by Latinx LIFE, NC100, Next Gen Alliance 336. Hosted by UNCG SALSA

🗣Come explore the importance of doing something bigger all together &amplifying our voices!

🎙 The following dialogue will be centered around the stories of underserved communities:

∘Voting History in USA
∘What’s Changing with Voting Laws & Practices
∘Tips on Mobilizing & Organizing
∘Exercises to Gain Comfort in Vocalizing your Beliefs/Rights

💥 The more people we get involved in the conversation, the more unified we have the chance to become.

😊 Bring a friend! All are welcome.

4th – “NOTAS MIGRANTES:  A young Argentinian doctor’s journey through Latin America” 

Virtual/Zoom 4:00pm-5:15pm

Join Zoom Meeting: https://uncg.zoom.us/j/95734934384

Meeting ID: 957 3493 4384

Dr. Matías Murano presents details from his book, Notas Migrantes, the story of a young Argentinian doctor’s travels in Latin America. A sort of anthropological notebook, it chronicles Murano’s encounters with diverse Indigenous communities throughout the region, reflecting on their ways of conceiving the world as well as on their forms of healing.  Welcomed into homes and villages, Murano studies ancient practices while at the same time forming new bonds of friendship and fresh insights into the tensions between the natural and the “civilized” worlds. 

Intended audience: UNCG students, faculty & staff 

Organizers: Sarah Carrig & Dr. Kelly Lowther Pereira/SHL Program, Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

5th – Latinx Connections Support Group

Join Zoom Meeting, Meeting ID: 926 3741 0853, Passcode: 948733

This weekly discussion group is open to all Latin-identified UNCG students, regardless of identities, nationality, or racial/ethnic background. A supportive  atmosphere to engage in fun activities, interactions  and conversations. A willingness to engage and honor group members’ privacy are the only requirements to attend.

Every Wednesday 3:30 to 4:30 Zoom 

5th – The Spanish Heritage Language (SHL) Program presents: Nuestras raíces

Location: Virtual/Zoom 

Join Zoom Meeting:  https://uncg.zoom.us/j/93383891567

Meeting ID: 933 8389 1567

Brief Description: Current Hispanic and Latinx students in the Spanish Heritage Language Program share about their families’ roots, countries of origin, cultural traditions & artifacts, and original poems about their bilingual identities. Come learn about the rich diversity of our students! 

Intended audience: UNCG students, faculty & staff 

Start and end time: 5:00pm-6:15pm

Organizer: Dr. Kelly Lowther Pereira (klpereir@uncg.edu)

5th – Salsa Lessons with Ritmo Latino 

Location: coleman building common area second floor (in person)

Brief Description: Teach UNCG students basics of a certain Latin genre to enhance their dancing experiences (Salsa)

Intended audience: UNCG students

6th – Amplifying Latina/o/x/e college student experiences and motivations: A Latinx student panel for Latinx college students, Latinx youth interested in college, and parents or families of Latinx students.

3:00pm via Zoom. Once you register you will receive a confirmation email with all the event details. 

This panel features current UNCG Latinx/a/o/e college students. Panelists will discuss their experiences in college with an emphasis on motivations, support systems, & the hidden curriculum of college. The panel is especially designed for parents & families of prospective & current students, prospective & current students, & those interested in better supporting Latinx/a/o/e  students in college.

Este panel presenta a Latinx/a/o/e estudiantes universitarios de UNCG. Los panelistas discutirán sus experiencias en la universidad con énfasis en las motivaciones, los sistemas de apoyo y el plan de estudios oculto de la universidad. El panel está especialmente diseñado para padres y familias de estudiantes actuales y potenciales, estudiantes actuales y potenciales, y aquellos interesados en apoyar mejor a los estudiantes Latinx/a/o/e en la universidad.

12th – Latinx Connections Support Group

Join Zoom Meeting, Meeting ID: 926 3741 0853, Passcode: 948733

This weekly discussion group is open to all Latin-identified UNCG students, regardless of identities, nationality, or racial/ethnic background. A supportive  atmosphere to engage in fun activities, interactions  and conversations. A willingness to engage and honor group members’ privacy are the only requirements to attend.

Every Wednesday 3:30 to 4:30 Zoom 

12th – Cafe y Conversation

Hosted by the Literatures, Languages, and Cultures department to highlight the Spanish minors and majors. Come enjoy coffee varieties sustainably sourced from Latin American countries, and churros provided by Sofrito. 

Taylor Garden, rain location is OIE, 1:30-2:30pm

13th – Open House in Jackson Library for Latinx Students, Faculty, and Staff

Jackson Library lobby, 1pm-3pm

Join UNCG librarians for an informal, open event designed to help you learn more about how we can support you. There will be free coffee and churros! No RSVP needed, drop in at any time.

14th – Zumba class sponsored by Alianza

4:30-5:30pm, Library Lawn

Brief description: Zumba is an energizing dance fitness class based on Latin American dance rhythms. Comfortable clothing and shoes are recommended. All are welcome!

15th – Decorando Calaveras (Sugar Skull Decorating)

In front of Shaw Residence 3pm, all faculty, staff, students, and alumni are welcome!  

https://www.facebook.com/rsrc.php/v3/yg/r/YahdT5DovMC.png
If you would like to share your heritage month programs, please contact intercultural@uncg.edu

Partners:

Alianza Latino Faculty and Staff Association

Undergraduate Admissions

Alumni Affairs

Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Counseling Center

Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion

College of Visual and Performing Arts

College of Arts and Sciences, Dean’s Office

School of Education

Office of Intercultural Engagement

Career and Professional Development

Housing and Residence Life

Recreation and Wellness

ALPFA UNCG

CAMINOS Lab

Chi Upsilon Sigma

Corazon Folklorico

Lambda Theta Alpha

Lambda Theta Phi

Ritmo Latino

SALSA

What does it mean to be Latino? Hispanic? Chicano?

What does it mean to be Latino? Hispanic? Chicano? Why is it sometimes spelled Latin@? What are the differences in experience based on ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, geography, class and other variables? How does the constructed image of undocumented immigrants “taking jobs away” from American citizens “shape the consciousness of people in the community?”

September 15 through October 15 was first declared Hispanic Heritage Month by Ronald Reagan in 1988. How has the community changed since then? This dialogue is an opportunity for the Latino community and its allies to reflect on Latino identity development within the broader social, political and economical context in order to gain insight into its future.

Hispanic Heritage Month celebrates the anniversary of independence of Latin American Countries. September 15 is the independence anniversary of five Latin American countries—Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Mexico declared its independence on September 16, and Chile on September 18.

Quick Facts:
Hispanic” is a term defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, which refers to Spanish-speaking people in the United States of any race.

Mariachi goes beyond music; it is the sum of a cultural revolution expressed through a group of musicians, dressed in popular clothing (most recently charro suits) which encompasses the essence of Mexico and its people. It is something cultural, spiritual and traditional that is unique to this country, an experience not to be missed.

Samba is an African-Brazilian dance with several variations in different parts of Brazil. The term originates from semba, an African word for navel. Traditionally, a circle is made with a solo dancer in the center. In the samba’s rhythm there is a syncopated note which is the cue for the soloist to touch, with her navel, the navel of the chosen person to replace her in the circle. It is sometimes referred to as a Samba, Carioca, a Baion or a Batucado. The difference is mostly in the tempo played since the steps in all three dance styles are very similar. The style is to bounce steadily and smoothly in 2/4 meter.

Panama Folkloric Dances are traditional dances passed down from generation to generation. With most dances, each region has its own particular characteristics or exclusive traits which differentiate it from others. However, the tamborito—Panama’s national dance—is found in almost every region of the Republic, but the basic dance changes little from one province to another.

Axe—A contemporary Afro-Brazilian pop style, incorporating samba, rock, soul and other musical influences. A musical style of percussion from the northern part of Brazil.

Capoeira (ka/po/where/ah) is an Afro-Brazilian martial art developed initially by African slaves in Brazil, starting in the colonial period. It is marked by deft, tricky movements often played on the ground or completely inverted. It also has a strong acrobatic component in some versions and is always played with music. Capoeira has recently been popularized in a number of computer games. Two capoeiristas, Eddie Gordo and Christie Monteiro, fight in the popular games Tekken 3, Tekken 4, and Tekken 5. Elena fights Capoeira in the game Street Fighter III. In addition, Meet the Fockers and Ocean’s Twelve, two highly successful movies of 2004, featured Capoeira in several memorable scenes. While the attention Capoeira has received has caused a boom of interest in this martial art, more skeptical capoeiristas have argued that the way it is used in the media is misrepresentative of what Capoeira truly is.

Salsa is danced to music with a recurring eight-beat pattern, i.e. two bars of four beats. Salsa patterns typically use three steps during each four beats, one beat being skipped. However, this skipped beat is often marked by a tap, a kick, a flick, etc. Typically the music involves complicated percussion rhythms and is fast with around 180 beats per minute. Salsa is a spot dance, i.e., unlike Foxtrot or Samba, in Salsa a couple does not travel over the dance floor much, but rather occupies a fixed area on the dance floor. In some cases, people do the Salsa in solo mode.